Type 2 Diabetes – Weight Training Offers Many Health Benefits When You Have Diabetes

Resistance training has gained popularity over recent years. Gyms are now standard in most communities and you will be hard-pressed to find someone who has not at least considered giving weight training a shot. The problem, however, is not accessibility or awareness but rather the lack of discipline required to make weight training a habit.

There are many gyms whose entire business revolves around selling yearlong memberships knowing many clients will only use the gym for a few months at most. So before we give some advice for people who have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes who want to start weight training to improve their health, we have to start with the following: if you are not going to be consistent with your weight training program, there is no point in getting started. With that said, the motivation to get started should be there.

Weight training offers an extensive list of health benefits, which makes it undeniably important for anyone with Type 2 diabetes. A very short list of these benefits include…

improved blood sugar control,
decreased insulin resistance,
weight loss,
muscle hypertrophy,
strengthens your immune system,
increased energy and better moods,
increased self-esteem.

Only a few of these are particularly important for people with diabetes. But you can likely agree all of them are important to you, whether you consider your blood sugar levels or not.

Moreover, the importance of a healthy diet should not be overlooked. Even if weight training can help you lose weight, it is simply not going to happen if your food choices are poor and you are overeating. But we digress.

Many people have attempted weight training before in some shape or form. We are going to assume you are a beginner. For starters, weight training is ideal because it stresses your muscles with resistance, causing your muscles to adapt, strengthen, and pull sugar out of your bloodstream. It is also an excellent way to burn calories provided your training is intense enough.

Always start slowly and work your way up. A program based around bodyweight exercises is more than sufficient to get you started…

air squats,
push-ups (assisted or not),
sit-ups, and
planks

are ideal as an introduction to resistance training. Perhaps you could seek the assistance of a personal trainer for at least a few sessions, so you learn how to structure your program and get to use exercise machines correctly.

Also, don’t be afraid to do some cardio along with your weight training. It is an efficient way to burn more calories and get the most from your workouts.

Eating healthily and exercising are the two best steps to take to manage your blood sugar. The benefits of exercise outweigh the risks in almost every person, but consult your doctor about any precautions you should take before starting. Particular types of exercises are taboo with certain complications associated with Type 2 diabetes and with some medications.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

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Type 2 Diabetes – Change Your Attitude Towards Diabetes and Take Back Your Life

Firstly, let us begin by saying the message underlying this discussion is not necessarily directed towards you. But since we have to consider the average Type 2 diabetic, we need to focus on a general message. When this form of diabetes is diagnosed, the facts and figures about the epidemic recede and then it becomes a deeply felt personal issue. Whether you can fully treat your blood sugar level or not isn’t the point. Rather, at the very least you should try to manage it. The last thing you need is to see your blood sugar levels and weight get so far out of control; your health goes on a downward spiral. So far, drug therapy has proven to be less effective than lifestyle modification. It is hard to recover once the worst-case scenarios come into play. Unfortunately, there are long-term complications connected to prolonged periods of high blood sugar. You likely know some of them…

damage to blood vessels (vascular problems), and
difficulties with the feet, eyes, nerves, and skin, as well as
kidney, urinary and sexual functions.

Some of these complications carry lethal ramifications, whereas others are inconvenient.

Despite the gloom, you should not get down on yourself. It is crucial to be realistic and cognizant of what may occur to you. But that doesn’t mean you cannot prepare yourself for the worst, as you hope for the best.

In reality, if you make the right decisions, there is a lot you can do to improve your situation. Much more than you may think. Your current attitude towards elevated blood sugar levels may be giving you an incredibly narrow perspective.

Don’t see Type 2 diabetes as an obstacle to healthy living. See it as an opportunity to instill new habits to improve your health for the rest of your life. For instance, you must now learn to control your blood sugar. So start controlling your intake of unhealthy carbohydrates; both the quantity and quality of carbohydrates determine the glycemic load of a meal. The total amount of carbohydrates consumed is the strongest predictor of how high your blood sugar is going to be. Start exercising if you haven’t already. And if you are already active, change your routine around. Resistance training, for instance, is commonly overlooked, which is unfortunate because it is an incredibly efficient way to lower your insulin resistance and blood sugar.

Just knowing healthy eating and physical activity will help to maintain lower blood sugar levels should be enough motivation to get you started. Becoming more physically active may also mean you have less trouble changing your eating style. The benefits of exercise outweigh any risk in almost every person, but consult your doctor about any precautions you should take before you start-up. Managing your Type 2 diabetes is an opportunity to improve your overall health. You won’t have a better opportunity to set things straight.

If you have Type 2 diabetes, now is the time to take control of the disease and take back your life.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

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Type 2 Diabetes – Vitamin C May Help Reduce the Diabetes Risk

In September of 2016, the online journal PLOS ONE reported on a study linking the dietary vitamin C, ascorbic acid, with a lowered risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Scientists at Harbin Medical University in the People’s Republic of China looked at hundreds of new cases of Type 2 diabetes. They divided the new situations in the Harbin residents into two groups…

Group 1 – The Harbin People Health Study – a total 178 new cases of Type 2 diabetes were seen in 3483 of the participants enrolled in this study.

Group 2 – Harbin Cohort Study on Diet, Nutrition, and Chronic Non-communicable Diseases – 522 new cases were observed in 7,595 people also enrolled in this particular study.

The results were…

In the Harbin People Health Study, Group 1, the participants who were found to have the highest level of vitamin C had over 40 percent less risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest vitamin C levels.
In the Harbin Cohort Study on Diet, Nutrition and Chronic Non-communicable Diseases, Group 2, it was found the participants with the highest vitamin C levels had greater than 20 percent less risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

From the above results, the researchers concluded vitamin C is helpful for lowering the risk of Type 2 diabetes. They suggest it works by reducing both the number of free radicals and the degree of insulin resistance.

Vitamin C is an antioxidant that helps cells to stay alive by keeping down the levels of free radicals. Vitamin C is water-soluble, meaning the body is unable to store it and it must be replenished each and every day.

A vitamin C deficiency can result in a disease called scurvy. Signs and symptoms of scurvy include…

bleeding or swollen gums and tooth loss,
a shortness of breath,
painful joints,
irritability or unhappiness,
the presence of bluish-red spots on the skin,
tiredness,
a poor appetite,
diarrhea,
weight loss.

British sailors were given a derogatory nickname “Limey” when it was discovered back in the 19th-century lemon or lime juice was added to the daily rations of sailors. It was added to the sailor’s watered-down rum.

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin C is…

adult men 90 mg,
adult women 75 mg,
expectant mothers 85 mg,
breastfeeding mothers 125 mg,
all smokers. The same amounts as above plus an additional 35 mg. Smoking destroys vitamins, particular vitamin C and B’s.

Foods high in vitamin C. We all know about citrus fruits, so let’s look at a few other foods…

cabbage – 10 leaves 84 mg,
kale – 1 cup, chopped, 80 mg,
papaya – 1 cup 83 mg,
strawberries – 1 cup 85 mg,
bell peppers, red, – ½ cup 70 mg,
broccoli – 1 stalk, 135 mg.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

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